In a world beyond their control they found an escape. 


Rich Kids is a film that sympathetically views the modern day and ongoing challenges of economic disparities, gentrification, displacement and evictions faced through the lens of Latino and Afro-Latino American youth.   

The screenplay (by Somers & Saldaña) is based on an actual event that took place in Somers’ childhood home, after a group of neighborhood teens broke into the family home and stayed for several days before the event ended in tragedy.  The film’s title, Rich Kids, signifies the wealth of love, talent, intelligence, and emotional resilience that the characters have in spite of their economic challenges while living in a world that views them with skepticism and indifference.

THE STORY

Matías is a bright teenager whose family struggles with harsh financial troubles. When he discovers “Los Ricos”, a wealthy family, are out of town, Matías breaks into their mansion where he and his friends spend an afternoon basking in the good life. The party is soon disrupted when a trouble-making relative shows up uninvited. Loyalties are then pushed to the breaking point as Matías’s desire for power in the house rises. 

At it's heart, Rich Kids is about a young man’s transformation from the person he thinks he's supposed to be into the person he really is, as he comes to terms with the realities and consequences of living a community ravaged by the wealth gap and income inequality.

This vibrant portrait of six troubled teenagers showcases the talents of our young charismatic cast, and is set over a period of less than 24 hours in a limited number of locations in South Houston, TX. 


What struck me upon reading Rich Kids for the first time was how uncanny the parallels between Matt’s life and my own were. I grew up in Houston in a low income household, so does Matt in the film. I had a turbulent relationship with my father (who worked in construction), so does Matt in the film (who’s father works in construction). I even rode my bike around to escape my home life, as Matt does for much of the film. It gave me a sense of empathy for a character unlike any I’ve ever felt. I didn’t really feel like I was acting because I felt like I was playing myself.
— Gerardo Velasquez: Matías